• APR 29

    Good, Clean, Fair Meat

    ​This half-day workshop explores the local world of meat production, marketing, and consumption. Join the founder of the Portland Meat Collective as we consider the historical, environmental, ethical, economic, and culinary facets of being an omnivore. Note: This is a collaboration with Portland Underground Graduate School and is not a hands-on butchery or cooking class like our normal PMC classes.  The class will be lecture and discussion-based and will include a reading assignment you will need to complete ahead of time.

    In Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer writes, “there is something about eating animals that tends to polarize: never eat them or never sincerely question eating them; become activist or disdain activist.” A growing number of producers and consumers wonder whether there are stances in between. Slow Food International calls one such stance “good, clean, fair” meat: in this class we’ll explore what that can and cannot mean.

    Is it possible to produce and consume meat sustainably and humanely? If 99% of the animals currently raised for food in America are factory farmed, what about the other 1%? Does a person have to be a 1%-er themselves in order to be able to afford that kind of meat? What does purchasing that 1% of meat require of us economically and culturally? What does “good, clean, fair” meat even look like (or taste like), and how will purchasing it require you to change the way you cook and eat?  

    In this discussion-based workshop you will discover:

    -An overview of the environmental, cultural, and economic issues surrounding meat production in the industrial world

    -A brief history of the “good, clean, fair” meat movement

    -A discussion of the limits and definitions of “humane” and “sustainable” in the context of meat production

    -A review of current choices in the marketplace for meat eaters, including an overview of current meat labeling practices and their meaning (or lack thereof)

    -An introduction to sourcing, cooking, and eating “good, clean, fair” meat in Portland


    Camas Davis
    Instructor
    • date
      April 29, 2017
    • time
      1:00pm - 5:00pm
    • cost
      $65.00
    • REGISTER NOW

Class Details

This class is a collaboration with the Portland Underground Graduate School (PUGS). Therefore PUGS will be handling registration and payment and not the Portland Meat Collective. Because of this, Portland Underground Graduate School​ refund and class attendance policies apply to this class and not Portland Meat Collective refund and class attendance policies. Please visit the PUGS website to familiarize yourself with the organization and their policies. 

  • 1:00pm - 5:00pm, April 29, 2017

    Good, Clean, Fair Meat

    ​This half-day workshop explores the local world of meat production, marketing, and consumption. Join the founder of the Portland Meat Collective as we consider the historical, environmental, ethical, economic, and culinary facets of being an omnivore. Note: This is a collaboration with Portland Underground Graduate School and is not a hands-on butchery or cooking class like our normal PMC classes.  The class will be lecture and discussion-based and will include a reading assignment you will need to complete ahead of time.

    In Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer writes, “there is something about eating animals that tends to polarize: never eat them or never sincerely question eating them; become activist or disdain activist.” A growing number of producers and consumers wonder whether there are stances in between. Slow Food International calls one such stance “good, clean, fair” meat: in this class we’ll explore what that can and cannot mean.

    Is it possible to produce and consume meat sustainably and humanely? If 99% of the animals currently raised for food in America are factory farmed, what about the other 1%? Does a person have to be a 1%-er themselves in order to be able to afford that kind of meat? What does purchasing that 1% of meat require of us economically and culturally? What does “good, clean, fair” meat even look like (or taste like), and how will purchasing it require you to change the way you cook and eat?  

    In this discussion-based workshop you will discover:

    -An overview of the environmental, cultural, and economic issues surrounding meat production in the industrial world

    -A brief history of the “good, clean, fair” meat movement

    -A discussion of the limits and definitions of “humane” and “sustainable” in the context of meat production

    -A review of current choices in the marketplace for meat eaters, including an overview of current meat labeling practices and their meaning (or lack thereof)

    -An introduction to sourcing, cooking, and eating “good, clean, fair” meat in Portland


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