Local Meat Resources In the Time of Corona

March 18, 2020

Grocery store shelves and meat cases are looking pretty empty this week. There's no time like the present to start sourcing meat directly from local, responsible meat producers as well as the butcher shops who source from those producers.  Many producers have lost their restaurant accounts and have a surplus of meat on their hands. And processors are struggling to keep up with demand. The Good Meat Project, our sister nonprofit, is minute-by-minute compiling resources to ensure access to local meat during COVID-19 and beyond. Consumers, farmers, ranchers, food professionals, and processors, check out these this list of resources the Good Meat Project put together:  

  • If you are a consumer looking to stock your freezers with local, responsible meat:
    • Search for local farms in your area online and reach out to them directly. Many communities have farm support organizations that maintain an online catalog of local farms and their products. LocalHarvest and EatWild are two examples. You may find leads to this via google or homesteading and food groups on social media. 
    • Farmers markets may be closed, but you can go to their website or call to find contact information for their regular vendors.
    • Search online for local butcher shops that are dedicated to sourcing meat from local, responsible sources and utilizing the whole animals. The Good Meat Project is building a national database of whole animal butcher shops who source local meat. We are updating it hour by hour so the list will continue to grow. 
    • The Niche Meat Processor's Assistance Network (NMPAN) keeps a list of livestock farmers who are NMPAN members and also sell their meats online. You can view that list here
    • Contact your local Meat Collective! These are organizations and businesses around the country that the Good Meat Project trains to offer whole-animal butchery classes using locally-sourced, responsibly-raised meat. While they likely aren’t offering classes in the face of COVID-19, they are great information resources. 
    • See below for more resources.
  • If you are a farmer struggling to find processing services:
  • No matter if you are a farmer/rancher, a processor, a food professional, or a consumer:
    • Sign up for the Meat Collectives Switchboard, an online marketplace, networking, and information exchange hub that the Good Meat Project maintains for consumers, farmers, food professionals, and processors across the country. Ask each other questions, network, and buy and sell responsibly raised meat! It’s free to sign up. 
    • NC MeatSuite is an online marketing tool to help customers easily find locally produced, affordable, and delicious meat in bulk. MeatSuite was created to increase sales of local meat in bulk quantities (quarters, halves, wholes) directly from farm to consumer. Consumers can search for farmers selling local meats in their area using criteria such as location, species, and farm practices. Add a farm profile or search for farms at meatsuite.com
    • There are other meat educators and groups active all over the country who are working toward local, responsible, healthy meat production systems. We’re trying to connect as many of you who want to organize in your communities around access to local meat to one another as we can. If you are interested in accessing or making us aware of existing good meat resources in your community , and/or for accessing humane processing and butchery in your area, fill out this form. A collaborative team of educators, organizations, butchers, farmers, will collect your information and share with people in your community to help mutual aid networks organize and act to ensure that farmers/ranchers, food professionals, and consumers have the support they need. 
  • March 18, 2020

    Local Meat Resources In the Time of Corona

    There's no time like the present to start sourcing meat directly from local, responsible meat producers as well as the butcher shops who source from those producers. Many producers have lost their restaurant accounts and have a surplus of meat on their hands. And processors are struggling to keep up with demand. The ​Good Meat Project, our sister nonprofit has resources for you.  

    More >